First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.

Welcome to Saint Mary's

To  

those  

of  

us  

who  

worship  

here,  

it  

is  

a  

lovely  

place  

to  

hold  

services

and  

say  

prayers.  

There  

are  

about  

two  

hundred  

of  

us,  

a  

Church  

of

England  

congregation  

following  

the  

tradition  

of  

beautiful,  

well  

ordered,

but not over-elaborate, worship with classical English church music.

St  

Mary’s  

is  

the  

oldest  

and  

largest  

parish  

church  

in  

South  

East  

Essex,

UK.  

Founded  

in  

the  

seventh  

century,  

with  

remains  

of  

late  

Saxon  

walls,

twelfth  

century  

pillars,  

fifteenth  

century  

south  

aisle  

and  

tower,  

and  

an

impressive  

array  

of  

stained  

glass,  

including  

a  

window  

by  

the  

German

artist Dürer, it has to be seen to be fully appreciated.

We  

see  

ourselves  

as  

a  

company  

of  

Christ's  

people  

seeking  

to  

deepen

our  

own  

faith  

in  

the  

Lord  

Jesus  

and  

to  

spread  

that  

faith  

more  

widely.  

In

these   

activities,   

our   

church   

building   

is   

both   

an   

opportunity   

and   

an

inspiration.

We  

hope  

that  

these  

pages  

will  

allow  

you  

to  

share,  

if  

only  

in  

a  

small  

way,

something  

of  

what  

we  

have  

and  

what  

we  

do.  

Please  

pray  

with  

us  

that

we   

may   

use   

our   

inheritance,   

both   

spiritual   

and   

physical,   

for   

the

advancement of Christ's Kingdom and the Glory of His holy name.

St Marys Church Southside Looking West Assistant Curate: Revd Jacky Lindoe
St. Mary's is OPEN Tuesday to Friday 10.00 am - 3.00 pm PLEASE NOTE: THE CHURCH IS CLOSED DAYTIME ON MONDAYS
Vicar: The Revd Paul Mackay, email: revpaulstmarys@hotmail.com
ADVENT and CHRISTMAS SERVICES Tues 13th Dec 6pm-District Cubs Carols Wed 14th Dec 7pm-Memorial Service Sun 18th Dec 4pm-Christingle Service Sun 18th Dec 7pm-Nine Lessons and Carols Mon 19th Dec 6pm- Advent Reflective Service Tue 20th Dec 12.30pm-Advent Reflective Service Wed 21st Dec 12.30pm- Advent Reflective Service Thur 22nd Dec 6pm-Advent Reflective Service Christmas Eve 5pm-Toy/Crib Service Christmas Eve 11.30pm-Midnight Communion Christmas Day 8am-BCP HC & 9.30am-All Age Communion No midweek services between Christmas and the New Year
FAITH MATTERS Revd. Paul Talks About Faith Made by Mark Woodhouse    

Welcome to Saint Mary's

To  

those  

of  

us  

who  

worship  

here,  

it  

is  

a  

lovely  

place  

to

hold  

services  

and  

say  

prayers.  

There  

are  

about  

two

hundred   

of   

us,   

a   

Church   

of   

England   

congregation

following  

the  

tradition  

of  

beautiful,  

well  

ordered,  

but  

not

over-elaborate,  

worship  

with  

classical  

English  

church

music.

St  

Mary’s  

is  

the  

oldest  

and  

largest  

parish  

church  

in

South   

East   

Essex,   

UK.   

Founded   

in   

the   

seventh

century,   

with   

remains   

of   

late   

Saxon   

walls,   

twelfth

century  

pillars,  

fifteenth  

century  

south  

aisle  

and  

tower,

and  

an  

impressive  

array  

of  

stained  

glass,  

including  

a

window  

by  

the  

German  

artist  

Dürer,  

it  

has  

to  

be  

seen  

to

be fully appreciated.

We  

see  

ourselves  

as  

a  

company  

of  

Christ's  

people

seeking  

to  

deepen  

our  

own  

faith  

in  

the  

Lord  

Jesus  

and

to  

spread  

that  

faith  

more  

widely.  

In  

these  

activities,  

our

church    

building    

is    

both    

an    

opportunity    

and    

an

inspiration.

We  

hope  

that  

these  

pages  

will  

allow  

you  

to  

share,  

if

only  

in  

a  

small  

way,  

something  

of  

what  

we  

have  

and

what  

we  

do.  

Please  

pray  

with  

us  

that  

we  

may  

use  

our

inheritance,    

both    

spiritual    

and    

physical,    

for    

the

advancement  

of  

Christ's  

Kingdom  

and  

the  

Glory  

of  

His

holy name.

Vicar: The Revd Paul Mackay, email: revpaulstmarys@hotmail.com Assistant Curate: Revd Jacky Lindoe
ADVENT and CHRISTMAS SERVICES Tues 13th Dec 6pm-District Cubs Carols Wed 14th Dec 7pm-Memorial Service Sun 18th Dec 4pm-Christingle Service Sun 18th Dec 7pm-Nine Lessons and Carols Mon 19th Dec 6pm- Advent Reflective Service Tue 20th Dec 12.30pm-Advent Reflective Service Wed 21st Dec 12.30pm- Advent Reflective Service Thu 22nd Dec 6pm-Advent Reflective Service Christmas Eve 5pm-Toy/Crib Service Christmas Eve 11.30pm-Midnight Communion Christmas Day 8am-BCP HC & 9.30am-All Age Communion No midweek services between Christmas and the New Year
St. Mary's is OPEN Tuesday to Friday 10.00 am - 3.00 pm PLEASE NOTE: THE CHURCH IS CLOSED DAYTIME ON MONDAYS
First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
Faith Matters Revd. Paul in a short video by Mark Woodhouse

First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
High Altar and Sanctury. The central panel features the Canterbury Cross. On the side panels are the lily for St. Mary and a ship which represents St.Cedd sailing forth to spread Christianity, and also reflecting the Borough coat of arms.  The Banner of the Annunciation. This is a modern replacement in fine needlework of the earlier banner. It shows the angel Gabriel and the Blessed Virgin Mary. The Blessed Virgin and Child. The Mothers' Union banner stands to the left of the high altar.
SERVICES
SERVICES
Weekday Services Wednesday 10:30 am Eucharist Friday 12:00 noon Eucharist Mon - Thurs at 8.30am  A service of morning prayer (Except Bank Holidays), Sunday Services 8:00 am Holy Communion  9:30 am Sung Parish Eucharist 12:00 noon Baptisms (as arranged) 6:30 pm Evensong On second Sundays in the month, the 9:30 am Eucharist Service has a more 'child friendly' focus
SERVICES
The Blessed Virgin and Child. The Mothers' Union banner stands to the left of the high altar. High Altar and Sanctury. The central panel features the Canterbury Cross. On the side panels are the lily for St. Mary and a ship which represents St.Cedd sailing forth to spread Christianity, and also reflecting the Borough coat of arms.  The Banner of the Annunciation. This is a modern replacement in fine needlework of the earlier banner. It shows the angel Gabriel and the Blessed Virgin Mary.
Weekday Services Wednesday 10:30 am Eucharist Friday 12:00 noon Eucharist Mon - Thurs at 8.30am  A service of morning prayer (Except Bank Holidays), Sunday Services 8:00 am Holy Communion 9:30 am Sung Parish Eucharist 12:00 noon Baptisms (as arranged) 6:30 pm Evensong On second Sundays in the month, the 9:30 am Eucharist Service has a more 'child friendly' focus
First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
BAPTISMS
Baptism or Christening? The answer is: one and the same but different! (We could explain further, but you may grow much older in the process!) However if you live in the Church of England parish of Prittlewell (to check go to the following website and simply enter your postcode: http://www.achurchnearyou.com) you and/or your  children are welcomed to be Baptised at St Mary’s. Ideally, parents should be Baptised themselves. If you are not, we would be happy to talk with you about Baptising you at the same service as your child! If the Baptism is for a young child both parents and godparents will be asked to promise in the service that they will do what they can to bring the child up as a Christian, and we promise that we will make her/him welcome as part of the church. You may like to read below the part of the service which includes the promises you will be asked to make. There is no charge for Baptism at St Mary’s; however you might like to give a donation to the church as you can afford. Your next step on the path to Baptism is to come along to one of our Sunday services  and make yourself known to me Revd. Paul Mackay or alternatively You can Contact Us 

contact the Parish Administrator in person in the Church Office or by

telephone 01702 466471 on Wednesdays between 10:00 am and 2:30

pm, or Thursdays between 9:00 am and 12.30 pm,

or by email: stmaryprittlewell@gmail.com

Wherever possible, please contact the Church Office during these office

hours, but you may also telephone the Vicarage out of hours if needs be.

Instead, you may like to consider a Thanksgiving Service we can discuss this with you as well.
Baptismal Bowl Specially Handcrafted for St Mary's

Open service booklet

First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
BAPTISMS
Baptism or Christening? The answer is: one and the same but different! (We could explain further, but you may grow much older in the process!) However if you live in the Church of England parish of Prittlewell (to check go to the following website and simply enter your postcode: http://www.achurchnearyou.com) you and/or your  children are welcomed to be Baptised at St Mary’s. Ideally, parents should be Baptised themselves. If you are not, we would be happy to talk with you about Baptising you at the same service as your child! If the Baptism is for a young child both parents and godparents will be asked to promise in the service that they will do what they can to bring the child up as a Christian, and we promise that we will make her/him welcome as part of the church. You may like to read below the part of the service which includes the promises you will be asked to make. There is no charge for Baptism at St Mary’s; however you might like to give a donation to the church as you can afford. Your next step on the path to Baptism is to come along to one of our Sunday services  and make yourself known to me Revd. Paul Mackay or alternatively You can Contact Us  contact the Parish Administrator in person in the Church Office or by telephone 01702 466471 on Wednesdays between 10:00 am and 2:30 pm, or Thursdays between 9:00 am and 12.30 pm, or by email: stmaryprittlewell@gmail.com Wherever possible, please contact the Church Office during these office hours, but you may also telephone the Vicarage out of hours if needs be. Instead, you may like to consider a Thanksgiving Service we can discuss this with you as well.
Click For Service Booklet
First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
WEDDINGS
If you would like to arrange your wedding at St Mary’s please

contact the Parish Administrator in person in the Church Office or by telephone 01702

466471 on Wednesdays between 10:00 am and 2:30 pm, or Thursdays between 9:00 am and

12.30 pm, or by email: stmaryprittlewell@gmail.com

The initial cost of a wedding service for 2017 is £486. This covers all the legal fees and a verger. However, there are additional charge’s if you require them i.e. the services of our organist £110, for a choir £100, our peal of bells being rung £200 and or heating £60 when required - we will talk you though these when you enquire further. Bringing the total excluding heating £896. When you book your wedding we ask for a £110 deposit,  which covers the cost of booking an organist and is not refundable. If you have been previously married we will be happy to discuss with you whether a church wedding is possible.. Q: What if I want to be married in a different church? A: If you are a regular worshipper in that church, it is usually possible to be married there. Just speak to your minister. If you are not a regular worshipper, why not start attending? You will normally be expected to attend services for some time before becoming eligible to be married there. If you have a special connection with the church, you can apply for a Special Licence. To apply or find out more contact The Faculty Office, 1 The Sanctuary, Westminster, London SW1P 3JT, tel: 020 7222 5381. Q: I heard that you can get married in any church you want to now. Is this true? In July 2007, the General Synod (the Church of England’s governing body) approved steps to widen the wedding regulations; these came into effect in the Autumn of 2008. The regulations are designed to make it easier for couples to get married in a church that has special meaning to them. Provided the church is available, couples can choose to get married in: their local parish the parish where they were baptised and/or confirmed a parish they have lived in for 6 months or more, at any time during their lives a parish they have attended worship in for at least 6 months the parish their parents lived or worshipped in (during the child’s lifetime) the parish their parents or grandparents were married in. If there is a good reason, couples can apply for a Special Licence. To apply or find out more contact  The Faculty Office,  1 The Sanctuary, Westminster, London SW1P 3JT, tel: 020 7222 5381
First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
If you would like to arrange your wedding at St Mary’s please

contact the Parish Administrator in person in the Church

Office or by telephone 01702 466471 on Wednesdays

between 10:00 am and 2:30 pm, or Thursdays between

9:00 am and 12.30 pm, or by email:

stmaryprittlewell@gmail.com

The initial cost of a wedding service for 2017 is £486. This covers all the legal fees and a verger. However, there are additional charge’s if you require them i.e. the services of our organist £110, for a choir £100, our peal of bells being rung £200 and or heating £60 when required - we will talk you though these when you enquire further. Bringing the total excluding heating £896. When you book your wedding we ask for a £110 deposit,  which covers the cost of booking an organist and is not refundable. If you have been previously married we will be happy to discuss with you whether a church wedding is possible.. Q: What if I want to be married in a different church? A: If you are a regular worshipper in that church, it is usually possible to be married there. Just speak to your minister. If you are not a regular worshipper, why not start attending? You will normally be expected to attend services for some time before becoming eligible to be married there. If you have a special connection with the church, you can apply for a Special Licence. To apply or find out more contact The Faculty Office, 1 The Sanctuary, Westminster, London SW1P 3JT, tel: 020 7222 5381. Q: I heard that you can get married in any church you want to now. Is this true? In July 2007, the General Synod (the Church of England’s governing body) approved steps to widen the wedding regulations; these came into effect in the Autumn of 2008. The regulations are designed to make it easier for couples to get married in a church that has special meaning to them. Provided the church is available, couples can choose to get married in: their local parish the parish where they were baptised and/or confirmed a parish they have lived in for 6 months or more, at any time during their lives a parish they have attended worship in for at least 6 months the parish their parents lived or worshipped in (during the child’s lifetime) the parish their parents or grandparents were married in. If there is a good reason, couples can apply for a Special Licence. To apply or find out more contact  The Faculty Office,  1 The Sanctuary, Westminster, London SW1P 3JT, tel: 020 7222 5381
WEDDINGS
First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
FUNERALS
Bereavement is enough for anyone to try to cope with without the pressures of organising a funeral. In our experience the organising of the service, can be a complicated and emotionally draining time. So anything you can do to prepare is well worth doing. Registering the death can be difficult. Sometimes the coroner may have to be involved before the death can be registered. This happens when a doctor hasn’t been able to ascertain the cause of death immediately, or if the deceased has not seen a doctor for some time. You will need to contact a funeral director, who will be able to guide you through the organising of the funeral. It is important that you ask the funeral director any questions you might have, and share any thoughts. The funeral director is there to help you. You can contact the parish clergy direct on the numbers on our contact page, or ask the funeral director to do so. We will liaise with the funeral director to make sure that you are fully supported, and plan a service that meets your needs, and the wishes of your loved one. In our area, there are a number of possibilities for the funeral service. A service can be held in church. A service can be held in a crematorium chapel. A service can be held at the graveside. A service in church may conclude with a trip to a cemetery or a crematorium (in this case it is possible to have the committal in church, and ask the funeral director to proceed to the crematorium without you). After cremation, you may require us to be present at either the interment of your loved ones remains. The remains are normally placed in a wooden casket, and are buried in a simple ceremony lasting a few minutes. Again this can be arranged either directly with ourselves or through your chosen funeral director. Funeral service in church including the service of an organist and verger £310, plus choir £100 and if heating required £60 The Church of England statutory fees chart is on this link  https://www.churchofengland.org/weddings-baptisms-funerals/fees.aspx The clergy of St Mary’s are available to pray with anyone who is dying. If you would like to talk to a minister please write, telephone or email:

the Parish Administrator in person in the Church Office or by telephone 01702       

466471 on Wednesdays between 10:00 am and 2:30 pm, or Thursdays between 9:00 am

and 12.30 pm, or by email: stmaryprittlewell@gmail.com

Wherever possible, please contact the Church Office during these office hours, but you

may also telephone the Vicarage out of hours if needs be.

First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
FUNERALS
Bereavement is enough for anyone to try to cope with without the pressures of organising a funeral. In our experience the organising of the service, can be a complicated and emotionally draining time. So anything you can do to prepare is well worth doing. Registering the death can be difficult. Sometimes the coroner may have to be involved before the death can be registered. This happens when a doctor hasn’t been able to ascertain the cause of death immediately, or if the deceased has not seen a doctor for some time. You will need to contact a funeral director, who will be able to guide you through the organising of the funeral. It is important that you ask the funeral director any questions you might have, and share any thoughts. The funeral director is there to help you. You can contact the parish clergy direct on the numbers on our contact page, or ask the funeral director to do so. We will liaise with the funeral director to make sure that you are fully supported, and plan a service that meets your needs, and the wishes of your loved one. In our area, there are a number of possibilities for the funeral service. A service can be held in church. A service can be held in a crematorium chapel. A service can be held at the graveside. A service in church may conclude with a trip to a cemetery or a crematorium (in this case it is possible to have the committal in church, and ask the funeral director to proceed to the crematorium without you). After cremation, you may require us to be present at either the interment of your loved ones remains. The remains are normally placed in a wooden casket, and are buried in a simple ceremony lasting a few minutes. Again this can be arranged either directly with ourselves or through your chosen funeral director. Funeral service in church including the service of an organist and verger £310, plus choir £100 and if heating required £60 The Church of England statutory fees chart is on this link  https://www.churchofengland.org/weddings-baptisms- funerals/fees.aspx The clergy of St Mary’s are available to pray with anyone who is dying. If you would like to talk to a minister please write, telephone or email: the Parish Administrator in person in the Church Office or by telephone 01702466471 on Wednesdays between 10:00 am and 2:30 pm, or Thursdays between 9:00 am and 12.30 pm, or by email: stmaryprittlewell@gmail.com

Wherever possible, please contact the Church Office

during these office hours, but you may also telephone

the Vicarage out of hours if needs be.

First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
WHAT’S ON
DECEMBER 2016  ADVENT and CHRISTMAS SERVICES Tues 13th Dec  6pm-District Cubs Carols Wed 14th Dec 7pm-Memorial Service Sun 18th Dec 4pm-Christingle Service Sun 18th Dec 7pm-Nine Lessons and Carols Mon 19th Dec 6pm- Advent Reflective Service Tue 20th Dec 12.30pm-Advent Reflective Service Wed 21st Dec 12.30pm- Advent Reflective Service Thur 22nd Dec 6pm-Advent Reflective Service Christmas Eve 5pm-Toy/Crib Service Christmas Eve 11.30pm-Midnight Communion Christmas Day 8am-BCP HC & 9.30am-All Age Communion   No midweek services between Christmas and the New Year
The next Film Night is on 14 January 2017 at 6:30 pm in church. We will be  showing  Amazing  Grace. All welcome!
JANUARY 2017
First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
WHAT’S ON
DECEMBER 2016 ADVENT and CHRISTMAS SERVICES Tues 13th Dec  6pm-District Cubs Carols Wed 14th Dec 7pm-Memorial Service Sun 18th Dec 4pm-Christingle Service Sun 18th Dec 7pm-Nine Lessons and Carols Mon 19th Dec 6pm- Advent Reflective Service Tue 20th Dec 12.30pm-Advent Reflective Service Wed 21st Dec 12.30pm- Advent Reflective Service Thur 22nd Dec 6pm-Advent Reflective Service Christmas Eve 5pm-Toy/Crib Service Christmas Eve 11.30pm-Midnight Communion Christmas Day 8am-BCP HC & 9.30am-All Age Communion   No midweek services between Christmas and the New Year
JANUARY 2017
The next Film Night is on 14 January 2017 at 6:30 pm in church. We will be  showing  Amazing  Grace. All welcome!
First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
VICARS LETTERS
Send an Email to the Church
OCTOBER 2016 My Peace I give to you For the last two weeks I have been privileged and very blessed in being given the opportunity to lead the St Mary’s upper and lower school assemblies whilst Paul and Sue are away for a well deserved holiday. The theme running through the assemblies has been “Peace, God’s Peace, in the midst of hectic new beginnings.”We started with the words from John 14:25-27(NRSV)“I have said these things to you while I am still with you. But the Advocate, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you everything, and remind you of all that I have said to you. Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled, and do not let them be afraid. ”How extraordinarily comforting this passage is; it shows so very clearly how much Jesus wants us to live free from disturbance and to help us attain that peace we have the Holy Spirit who, if we but ask, will show and guide us when things get tough. Today’s assembly ended with a beautiful hymn “Spirit of God” the chorus of which I think is a wonderful prayer asking the Holy Spirit, our gift from God, to come into our lives and fill us with the love of Jesus.Spirit of God, as strong as the wind, Gentle as is the dove,Give us your joy and give us your peace, Show to us Jesus’ love. Peace like a coin has two sides; there is our own inner peace and there is the peace we have with each other. Sadly peace in our world today is in short supply. According to the Institute for Economics and Peace, which has produced the Global Peace Index for the past 10 years, there only 10 countries in the world today completely free from conflict. With so much conflict and antagonism in the world today it is almost impossible to imagine how we can turn things around, but Mother Teresa very famously said “Peace begins with a smile. Smile five times a day at someone you really don’t want to smile at; do it for peace”.How so very wise she was for a smile can be such a potent medicine, for the giver as well as the receiver. So let peace start with us, pray often to be filled with the Holy Spirit and remember to smile, at least five times a day. I wish you Shalom my friends. Jacky
Vicar: The Revd Paul Mackay, email: revpaulstmarys@hotmail.com Assistant Curate: Revd Jacky Lindoe
NOVEMBER 2016 Dear all This   year   is   the   first   Christmas   Sue   (my   wife)   and   I   will   be   here   at   St   Mary’s.   The   same applies   to   my   colleague   Revd.   Jacky;   as   curate   this   will   be   her   first   Christmas   as   an ordained   person.   It   reminds   me   of   something   I   did   in   my   curacy   at   one   Christmas service.    We    considered    who    was    the    real    “Madonna”?    Was    she    the    popstar?   The renaissance “perfect” young woman, or just an “ordinary” teenager? As   the   baby’s   mother,   the   Madonna   /   Mary   plays   a   crucial   part   in   the   Christmas   story.   It all   begins   with   the   visit   of   Gabriel   to   Mary:   “Do   not   be   afraid,   Mary,   you   have   found favour   with   God.   You   will   conceive   and   give   birth   to   a   son,   and   you   are   to   call   him Jesus.”   (Luke   1:30,31)   This   conversation   between   Gabriel   and   Mary   takes   us   straight   to the   heart   of   what   Christmas   is   all   about.   God   was   doing   something   unique,   that   had never been done before! “God   was   beginning,   at   this   divine   and   human   point,   the   New   Creation   of   all   things.   The whole soiled and weary universe quivered at this direct injection of essential life.” (CS Lewis). This   child   joins   heaven   and   earth   in   a   new   way:   the   eternal   enters   time   and   space   and pure   spirit   takes   on   flesh   and   blood.   God   becomes   a   human   being   in   the   baby   Jesus.   It reminds   me   of   the   sci–fi   film   in   which   a   team   of   surgeons   are   shrunk   to   the   size   of   blood cells and injected into the veins of a patient to perform lifesaving surgery. The   Christmas   message   affirms   that   God   has   entered   the   bloodstream   of   humanity   to put   things   right   with   him.   God   chose   an   unknown,   frightened   teenage   girl   to   bring   about this   new   beginning   for   all   of   us.   Her   response   is   the   pattern   for   us,   as   we   welcome   God’s special gift into our lives this Christmas: “‘I am the Lord’s servant,’ Mary answered. ‘May your word to me be fulfilled.’” (Luke 1:38). Mary   gave   an   unqualified   Yes   to   all   that   God   wanted   to   do   in   her   life.   Will   the   same   be true   for   us   this   Christmas?   Why   not   join   us   at   one   of   our   services   this   year   or   even   in   the New Year and ponder with us. In   the   meantime   God   Bless   you   and   yours   this   Christmas   2016   and   as   we   welcome   in 2017! Rev’d. Paul Mackay
First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
VICARS LETTER
NOVEMBER 2016                                        Dear all This   year   is   the   first   Christmas   Sue (my   wife)   and   I   will   be   here   at   St Mary’s.    The    same    applies    to    my colleague    Revd.    Jacky;    as    curate this   will   be   her   first   Christmas   as   an ordained   person.   It   reminds   me   of something   I   did   in   my   curacy   at   one Christmas   service.   We   considered who   was   the   real   “Madonna”?   Was she   the   popstar?   The   renaissance “perfect”   young   woman,   or   just   an “ordinary” teenager? As   the   baby’s   mother,   the   Madonna   /   Mary   plays   a   crucial part   in   the   Christmas   story.   It   all   begins   with   the   visit   of Gabriel   to   Mary:   “Do   not   be   afraid,   Mary,   you   have   found favour   with   God.   You   will   conceive   and   give   birth   to   a   son, and    you    are    to    call    him    Jesus.”    (Luke    1:30,31)    This conversation   between   Gabriel   and   Mary   takes   us   straight   to the   heart   of   what   Christmas   is   all   about.   God   was   doing something unique, that had never been done before! “God   was   beginning,   at   this   divine   and   human   point,   the New   Creation   of   all   things.   The   whole   soiled   and   weary universe quivered at this direct injection of essential life.” (CS Lewis). This   child   joins   heaven   and   earth   in   a   new   way:   the   eternal enters   time   and   space   and   pure   spirit   takes   on   flesh   and blood.   God   becomes   a   human   being   in   the   baby   Jesus.   It reminds   me   of   the   sci–fi   film   in   which   a   team   of   surgeons are   shrunk   to   the   size   of   blood   cells   and   injected   into   the veins of a patient to perform lifesaving surgery. The   Christmas   message   affirms   that   God   has   entered   the bloodstream   of   humanity   to   put   things   right   with   him.   God chose   an   unknown,   frightened   teenage   girl   to   bring   about this   new   beginning   for   all   of   us.   Her   response   is   the   pattern for   us,   as   we   welcome   God’s   special   gift   into   our   lives   this Christmas: “‘I   am   the   Lord’s   servant,’   Mary   answered.   ‘May   your   word to me be fulfilled.’” (Luke 1:38). Mary   gave   an   unqualified   Yes   to   all   that   God   wanted   to   do in   her   life.   Will   the   same   be   true   for   us   this   Christmas?   Why not   join   us   at   one   of   our   services   this   year   or   even   in   the New Year and ponder with us. In   the   meantime   God   Bless   you   and   yours   this   Christmas 2016 and as we welcome in 2017! Rev’d. Paul Mackay
Vicar: The Revd Paul Mackay, email: revpaulstmarys@hotmail.com
First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
PARISH MAGAZINES
October/November 2016 August /September 2016 June/July 2016 May 2016 April2016
Back issues of Prittlewell Parish Magazine from September 2008 are available upon request from the Parish Magazine Editor, email: prittlewellparishmag@vfemail.net
First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
PARISH MAGAZINE
October/November 2016
Parish Magazine December 16 / January 17
Parish Magazine October / November
Back issues of Prittlewell Parish Magazine from September 2008 are available upon request from the Parish Magazine Editor, email: prittlewellparishmag@vfemail.net
First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
BELL RINGING
The Bells of St. Mary's The church tower was completed in 1478 and the first mention of bells was in the inventory taken in 1552, when there were five bells and a Sanctus bell in the tower. A new frame was installed for these bells in 1550. In 1602, Richard Holdfield of Cambridge recast at least three of these bells. John Darbie of Ipswich recast the tenor bell in 1682. The fourth bell of the five fell down in 1772 and was recast at the Whitechapel bell foundry in 1773. Upon the installation of the clock by Thwaites and Reed of Clerkenwell in 1800, a clock bell, cast by Thomas Mears, was installed. This remains, and is now the oldest bell in the tower. A sixth bell was added in 1806, also cast by Thomas Mears. With the exception of this sixth bell, all of the old bells were recast by Mears and Stainbank in 1872; the tenor bell had been cracked since 1863 and was not in use. In 1895, Mears and Stainbank cast two smaller bells to complete the octave, and in 1902, John Warner added two further bells, to make the present ring of ten bells, and also recast the 1872 tenor bell. At this time the bells were rehung with completely new fittings in a new composite framework of cast iron frame sides and wooden sills. The bells were rehung on ball bearings in the 1960's by John Taylor of Loughborough. The 1902 frame was beginning to come to the end of its useful life, so major work had to be done. St. Mary's Prittlewell Bells fund was set up as a separately registered charity in 2008, with the task of securing funding for the replacement of the bells and frame. The Whitechapel Bell Foundry was awarded the contract, and cast the new bells in the middle of 2010. The work in the tower began on 9th August, and by the end of the week, all the old bells and the frame had been removed to Whitechapel. Nine of the old bells have been found new homes: the 9th, 6th and 3rd bells have been installed as a clock chime in the National Maritime Museum of Malta.
Pictures of the blessing and inauguration of these bells in Malta can be found at http://heritagemalta.org the 5th bell was sold to Millbrook in Bedfordshire the 4th bell was sold to Temple Guiting in Gloucestershire the treble was sold to Willingale in Essex the 2nd and 7th bells were sold to Kilburn in London the 8th bell is now in the foyer of the National Theatre despite attempts to find a home for the tenor, first in Lithuania and then in Germany, it has now been scrapped. Bakers of Danbury removed the old frame and installed the new floor under the bells. The Whitechapel Bell Foundry then installed a new frame. On November 5th 2010, the new bells were delivered to the Church and placed round the font, ready for a service of blessing and baptism at the family Eucharist service on 8th November. In view of the recent thefts of bells, parishioners and ringers arranged a "bell sit" from the night of Friday, 6th November to the morning of Monday, 9th November, when bell hangers from the Whitechapel Bell Foundry hoisted the bells into the tower. The installation of the bells and frame was completed in time for us to ring for Christmas. The bells were dedicated by the Archdeacon of Southend the Venerable David Loman, on Saturday, 8th January 2011, when they were formally handed over to the Archdeacon by Alan Hughes, Managing Director of the Whitechapel Bell Foundry. Following the dedication, the Archdeacon placed the bells into the care of the Vicar, Revd Shaun Conlon, who passed their day to day care in the hands of the Ringing Master, David Sloman, and the Master of the Ringing School, Peter Sloman. We are very pleased with the new bells and the glorious sound they make. Come along and hear them before one of our Sunday Services, or on a Monday night when we practice between 7.30 pm and 9.30 pm. Ongoing work The bells are fully operational and are bedding in nicely. There is still a little work to be done. Martin Newman, one of our Saturday School tutors, has made some magnificent oak seating for the ringing room, which has been redecorated by students from the Prospects College, a provider of apprenticeship training opportunities in building trades. When the oak panelling and belfry table have been re-polished, we will be fitting a new carpet. Prittlewell Ringing Centre A ringing centre for the teaching of bell ringing in the Southern part of Essex has been established for over twenty years. High tech computer software, cameras and ringing simulators are used at the centre, which runs each Saturday morning from 9.00am till 12 noon. Ringers taught at the centre over the years contributed to the new bells by sponsoring a "Saturday School Bell". The ringing centre is open to anyone interested in learning to ring church bells in the English "Full Circle" style. If you would like to give ringing a try or would like to contribute to the fund for the new bells and frame, please contact the chairman of the St Mary's Prittlewell Bells Fund, Peter Sloman, at peter.sloman@btinternet.com
First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
BELL RINGING
Prittlewell Ringing Centre A ringing centre for the teaching of bell ringing in the Southern part of Essex has been established for over twenty years. High tech computer software, cameras and ringing simulators are used at the centre, which runs each Saturday morning from 9.00am till 12 noon. Ringers taught at the centre over the years contributed to the new bells by sponsoring a "Saturday School Bell".The ringing centre is open to anyone interested in learning to ring church bells in the English "Full Circle" style. If you would like to give ringing a try or would like to contribute to the fund for the new bells and frame, please contact the chairman of the St Mary's Prittlewell Bells Fund, Peter Sloman, at peter.sloman@btinternet.com The Bells of St. Mary's The church tower was completed in 1478 and the first mention of bells was in the inventory taken in 1552, when there were five bells and a Sanctus bell in the tower. A new frame was installed for these bells in 1550. In 1602, Richard Holdfield of Cambridge recast at least three of these bells. John Darbie of Ipswich recast the tenor bell in 1682. The fourth bell of the five fell down in 1772 and was recast at the Whitechapel bell foundry in 1773. Upon the installation of the clock by Thwaites and Reed of Clerkenwell in 1800, a clock bell, cast by Thomas Mears, was installed. This remains, and is now the oldest bell in the tower. A sixth bell was added in 1806, also cast by Thomas Mears. With the exception of this sixth bell, all of the old bells were recast by Mears and Stainbank in 1872; the tenor bell had been cracked since 1863 and was not in use. In 1895, Mears and Stainbank cast two smaller bells to complete the octave, and in 1902, John Warner added two further bells, to make the present ring of ten bells, and also recast the 1872 tenor bell. At this time the bells were rehung with completely new fittings in a new composite framework of cast iron frame sides and wooden sills. The bells were rehung on ball bearings in the 1960's by John Taylor of Loughborough. The 1902 frame was beginning to come to the end of its useful life, so major work had to be done. St. Mary's Prittlewell Bells fund was set up as a separately registered charity in 2008, with the task of securing funding for the replacement of the bells and frame. The Whitechapel Bell Foundry was awarded the contract, and cast the new bells in the middle of 2010. The work in the tower began on 9th August, and by the end of the week, all the old bells and the frame had been removed to Whitechapel. Nine of the old bells have been found new homes: the 9th, 6th and 3rd bells have been installed as a clock chime in the National Maritime Museum of Malta.
First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
MUSIC
The Organ The organ in its present position was built and dedicated in 1876. It was completely rebuilt in 1915 by the reputable firm William Hill & Sons, famous for the organs of York Minster, Birmingham Town Hall and Sydney Town Hall. In 1925, an addition to the Pedal Organ of 'Trombone at Sixteen Feet' was given. The organ is built between the two Chancel arches and together with the Screen, separates the Chancel from the Jesus Chapel. There are two manuals and pedals of twenty speaking stops.In 1997, a very generous donation made it possible for a major restoration to be carried out by Harrison & Harrison of Durham, and at that time the key action was electrified and a 'mixture' added to the Great Organ. The organ features prominently in worship and is used to accompany the choir in the singing of hymns, canticles, psalms and anthems. Its versatility facilitates the performance of a wide range of repertoire from Baroque to Contemporary Music. Its fine tone is much admired by those who enjoy organ music and it now speaks with a more commanding voice than ever - and as it continues to proclaim God's glory one becomes "lost in wonder, love and praise".
The Choir The Choir leads the congregation in the singing of hymnns, canticles and psalms. The Choir's repertoire is large, and embraces anthems, two of which are sung every Sunday at Eucharist and Evensong, and also Cantatas and other works, which are performed on special occasions. Membership of the Choir is free and open to all. New members are welcome, and are given a very simple voice test after one month of attendance at rehearsals and services. Music at St. Mary's also includes performances by visiting groups - from Choral Societies to Brass Band Music. Concerts also include occasional Organ Recitals and are usually in aid of the various charities that St. Mary's supports.
The George Rogers & Sons Boudoir Grand Piano The piano is thought to be a rare example of an instrument made by the London manufacturer George Rogers. A serial number on the piano’s action indicates a production date of around 1898. Sadly, very few Rogers’ pianos of that era have survived to the present day. At that time, the Rogers workshop is thought to have produced pianos in London for the prestigious German manufacturer, Bechstein. The first 40 odd years of the piano’s life is a mystery. However, shortly after World War II, there is a record of it being lent by a local piano dealer to Southend Council to be used on Southend pier for the summer season entertainments. When the piano ceased to be needed for that purpose in the late 1940s, it became the pride and joy of Charles Fawcett, who later became a member of St. Mary’s congregation. By the late 1990s as Charles became increasingly infirm, he was unable to play his piano, so it fell sadly silent for many years. A serious water leak also caused substantial damage. After Charles died in 2004, the family decided to restore the piano in his memory. After extensive repair in Poland, the piano is now on long-term loan to St. Mary’s, where its tones would certainly have brought great happiness to Charles in his familiar pew at Evensong.
First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
MUSIC & CHOIR
The Organ The organ in its present position was built and dedicated in 1876. It was completely rebuilt in 1915 by the reputable firm William Hill & Sons, famous for the organs of York Minster, Birmingham Town Hall and Sydney Town Hall. In 1925, an addition to the Pedal Organ of 'Trombone at Sixteen Feet' was given. The organ is built between the two Chancel arches and together with the Screen, separates the Chancel from the Jesus Chapel. There are two manuals and pedals of twenty speaking stops.In 1997, a very generous donation made it possible for a major restoration to be carried out by Harrison & Harrison of Durham, and at that time the key action was electrified and a 'mixture' added to the Great Organ. The organ features prominently in worship and is used to accompany the choir in the singing of hymns, canticles, psalms and anthems. Its versatility facilitates the performance of a wide range of repertoire from Baroque to Contemporary Music. Its fine tone is much admired by those who enjoy organ music and it now speaks with a more commanding voice than ever - and as it continues to proclaim God's glory one becomes "lost in wonder, love and praise".
The Choir The Choir leads the congregation in the singing of hymnns, canticles and psalms. The Choir's repertoire is large, and embraces anthems, two of which are sung every Sunday at Eucharist and Evensong, and also Cantatas and other works, which are performed on special occasions. Membership of the Choir is free and open to all. New members are welcome, and are given a very simple voice test after one month of attendance at rehearsals and services. Music at St. Mary's also includes performances by visiting groups - from Choral Societies to Brass Band Music. Concerts also include occasional Organ Recitals and are usually in aid of the various charities that St. Mary's supports.
The George Rogers & Sons Boudoir Grand Piano The piano is thought to be a rare example of an instrument made by the London manufacturer George Rogers. A serial number on the piano’s action indicates a production date of around 1898. Sadly, very few Rogers’ pianos of that era have survived to the present day.
First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
GUIDE TO CHURCH
The plan shows the direction of a walk round the church looking at some detail on the way. In through the south porch.  Font on left. Along the cross aisle and left to the tower. Along the nave to the chancel and high altar. Through the organ screen to Jesus chapel. Back along the south aisle.
Tudor OakDoor. A fine example of carved sixteenth century woodwork. It is divided into five bays which are further divided into panels, each finely carved Holy Water Stoup. Set in the stone jamb on the right hand side in the porch beside the Tudor door. 16th Century Font. The font is octagonal in shape, 2 foot and 7 inches in diameter. Six of the concave sides bear sculptured ornaments. The east facing panel bears a crucifix, now difficult to see. Other panels have a Tudor rose. The Niche Besdie Font. The niche in the pillar was used for holding the oil and salt used at baptisms in days before the Reformation. The Red Cross Flag. This is the Red Cross flag that flew over the Glen Military Hospital, one of three naval and military hospitals in the Borough during the Great War of 1914 - 1918. Coffer Panel. This is one of a pair of traceried coffer panels carved in oak.Fourteenth century. (Coffer - a box or chest used to hold church documents or vestments.)Very few examples of these now survive. Mellitus window. The scene in the Mellitus window depicts St. Mellitus (left) and King Saeberht of the East Saxons (right) watching the building of the Saxon church at Prittlewell.The Saxon burial recently found in Prittlewell may be of King Saeberht. Mural Tablet. Here lieth buried Mary Davies the wiffe of Richard Davies (the sonne of John Davies the elder of Middleton in the County of Salop Esq.) Esq., of the Body Exterordinary unto his Magisty. Shee was the eldest daughter and heire of Richard Cocke The Mayorall Stall. Used by the Mayor of Southend at civic functions in the church. The stall was donated by Alderman S.F.Johnson to mark his years of Mayoralty between 1945 and 1949. The stall was made in the workshops of Ald. Johnson's building business 7th Century Saxon Arch. The remains of the early seventh century Saxon doorway, built with Roman bricks, can be seen behind the choir stalls on the north wall of the Chancel. The arch and part of the surrounding wall can also be seen in the external north Chancel Roof. The picture shows only part of the Chancel roof, but there are four carved figures of angels forming the finials of the hammer beams on each side of the roof, all with their hands clasped in the attitude of prayer and facing the altar. 16th Century Stained Glass. Although there has been considerable debate about who designed the glass, many experts now agree that the work is most probably by Albrecht Dürer of Nuremberg.The glass panels were originally in the church of St Ouen at Rouen, Piscina.  This is a piscina - a perforated stone basin for carrying away water used in rinsing chalices after Holy Communion Virgin and Child. Designed by Sir Charles Nicholson, the statue was given to the church in the 1930's. Also in this picture is an Icon of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Child.This icon comes from Bulgaria and was presented to the church in 1997. The King Alfred Window. The central figure is that of King Alfred the Great.At the bottom of the centre light, dressed in the Crusaders' black mantle, is the figure of Raymond du Puy, the first Grand Master of the Knights of St John of Jerusalem. St, Michael + St. George Chapel. Behind this small door is a difficult to negotiate steep and narrow stone staircase leading to the now disused chapel of St. Michael and St. George.
First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
GUIDE TO CHURCH
The plan shows the direction of a walk round the church looking at some detail on the way. In through the south porch.  Font on left. Along the cross aisle and left to the tower. Along the nave to the chancel and high altar. Through the organ screen to Jesus chapel. Back along the south aisle.
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Holy Water Stoup. Set in the stone jamb on the right hand side in the porch beside the Tudor door. Tudor OakDoor. A fine example of carved sixteenth century woodwork. It is divided into five bays which are further divided into panels, each finely carved 16th Century Font. The font is octagonal in shape, 2 foot and 7 inches in diameter. Six of the concave sides bear sculptured ornaments. The east facing panel bears a crucifix, now difficult to see. Other panels have a Tudor rose. The Niche Besdie Font. The niche in the pillar was used for holding the oil and salt used at baptisms in days before the Reformation. The Red Cross Flag. This is the Red Cross flag that flew over the Glen Military Hospital, one of three naval and military hospitals in the Borough during the Great War of 1914 - 1918. Mellitus window. The scene in the Mellitus window depicts St. Mellitus (left) and King Saeberht of the East Saxons (right) watching the building of the Saxon church at Prittlewell.The Saxon burial recently found in Prittlewell may be of King Saeberht. Coffer Panel. This is one of a pair of traceried coffer panels carved in oak.Fourteenth century. (Coffer - a box or chest used to hold church documents or vestments.)Very few examples of these now survive. Mural Tablet. Here lieth buried Mary Davies the wiffe of Richard Davies (the sonne of John Davies the elder of Middleton in the County of Salop Esq.) Esq., of the Body Exterordinary unto his Magisty. Shee was the eldest daughter and heire of Richard Cocke The Mayorall Stall. Used by the Mayor of Southend at civic functions in the church. The stall was donated by Alderman S.F.Johnson to mark his years of Mayoralty between 1945 and 1949. The stall was made in the workshops of Ald. Johnson's building business 7th Century Saxon Arch. The remains of the early seventh century Saxon doorway, built with Roman bricks, can be seen behind the choir stalls on the north wall of the Chancel. The arch and part of the surrounding wall can also be seen in the external north Chancel Roof. The picture shows only part of the Chancel roof, but there are four carved figures of angels forming the finials of the hammer beams on each side of the roof, all with their hands clasped in the attitude of prayer and facing the altar. 16th Century Stained Glass. Although there has been considerable debate about who designed the glass, many experts now agree that the work is most probably by Albrecht Dürer of Nuremberg.The glass panels were originally in the church of St Ouen at Rouen, Piscina.  This is a piscina - a perforated stone basin for carrying away water used in rinsing chalices after Holy Communion Virgin and Child. Designed by Sir Charles Nicholson, the statue was given to the church in the 1930's. Also in this picture is an Icon of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Child.This icon comes from Bulgaria and was presented to the church in 1997. The King Alfred Window. The central figure is that of King Alfred the Great.At the bottom of the centre light, dressed in the Crusaders' black mantle, is the figure of Raymond du Puy, the first Grand Master of the Knights of St John of Jerusalem. St, Michael + St. George Chapel. Behind this small door is a difficult to negotiate steep and narrow stone staircase leading to the now disused chapel of St. Michael and St. George.
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First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
GET INVOLVED
St Mary's 'Nearly New' is run every Thursday morning (9:30am - 12pm) by a very hard-working team that is made up of St Mary's congregation and people from Prittlewell. The Nearly New helps to raise much-needed cash by selling all sorts of things, from books through hand-made greetings cards, furnishings and clothes, toys and games, and anything useful or interesting? On the first Thursday of the month, home-made cakes are also on sale. The kitchen counter is open during the 'Nearly New', serving tea, coffee, toast, bacon sandwiches etc for a small price, and someone is usually playing the piano. Many people drop in here each week for a sit down and a natter, and all are welcome. [Please note the Nearly New is closed during January each year]
St Mary's Spiritual Growth committee arranges events to help the congregation deepen their faith at all stages of Christian life, including encouraging newcomers to the Church. The aim is to make available each year Two quiet days, led by the Vicar, one in Lent and the other in Advent ,A book to be read in Lent, the cost of which is subsidised ,Cards listing acts of worship for the periods of Christmas and Easter.  At least one course on an aspect of the Bible Prayer cards, both to request prayers on specific matters, and to aid personal prayer At least one course on what it means to be a Christian, in addition to the Lent Course run each year by the Clergy And, if we can, a pilgrimage, but this is not always possible The Spiritual Growth committee also oversees the prayer groups of St Mary's. These meet at different times throughout the month to pray for our world and its people, far and wide, local and personal. Each prayer group has around six or so members and has a distinctive way of praying. New groups can be formed at any time as more people want to join in. A Prayer Workshop was run recently, for our own congregation and for the Diocese of Chelmsford, to show that it is much easier to pray than many people think it is. We have also given a five week course called 'Pathways to Prayer' - to help individuals discover their own best way to pray - both for St Mary's and for the Diocese.
Pastoral Care. The sick and housebound are visited, at their request, to take Communion to them or maybe just to maintain their contact with the Church. The Pastoral Care Committee maintains a list of those to be visited. Requests for home visits and/or prayer in Church for someone in need may be made at any time. Please contact the Churchwardens or any member of the Pastoral team and the necessary arrangements will be made.
St Mary's Women's Fellowship meets on the first Monday afternoon of the month (at 2:30pm in the Guild Hall, St Mary's Road) to listen to talks on a variety of subjects, and to enjoy each other's company. All are welcome from the local community, as well as from St Mary's congregation. Contact details can be found in the Parish Magazine
 (ages 6-8)
 (ages 10-14)
 (ages 8-10)
1st Prittlewell Scout Group  has been part of St Mary’s Church since 1909, includes Beavers,Cubs,Scouts. We are one of the largest Scout Groups in Southend Estuary District with over 90 regular members.   We meet on Tuesday evenings during term times in the Church Halls. As well as weekly meetings where we work towards challenge and activity badges, we also take part in District Events, and go on camps and day trips.  If you have a young person who would like to join our Group please email with their name and date of birth and we will let you know if they are able to join straight away or add them to our waiting list.  Please send enquiries for Beavers, Cubs or Scouts by email to: cubs@1stprittlewell.org.uk
First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
GET INVOLVED
Pastoral Care. The sick and housebound are visited, at their request, to take Communion to them or maybe just to maintain their contact with the Church. The Pastoral Care Committee maintains a list of those to be visited. Requests for home visits and/or prayer in Church for someone in need may be made at any time. Please contact the Churchwardens or any member of the Pastoral team and the necessary arrangements will be made.
St Mary's Spiritual Growth committee arranges events to help the congregation deepen their faith at all stages of Christian life, including encouraging newcomers to the Church. The aim is to make available each year Two quiet days, led by the Vicar, one in Lent and the other in Advent , A book to be read in Lent, the cost of which is subsidised Cards listing acts of worship for the periods of Christmas and Easter At least one course on an aspect of the Bible Prayer cards, both to request prayers on specific matters, and to aid personal prayer At least one course on what it means to be a Christian, in addition to the Lent Course run each year by the Clergy And, if we can, a pilgrimage, but this is not always possible The Spiritual Growth committee also oversees the prayer groups of St Mary's. These meet at different times throughout the month to pray for our world and its people, far and wide, local and personal. Each prayer group has around six or so members and has a distinctive way of praying. New groups can be formed at any time as more people want to join in. A Prayer Workshop was run recently, for our own congregation and for the Diocese of Chelmsford, to show that it is much easier to pray than many people think it is. We have also given a five week course called 'Pathways to Prayer' - to help individuals discover their own best way to pray - both for St Mary's and for the Diocese.
St Mary's 'Nearly New' is run every Thursday morning (9:30am - 12pm) by a very hard-working team that is made up of St Mary's congregation and people from Prittlewell. The Nearly New helps to raise much-needed cash by selling all sorts of things, from books through hand-made greetings cards, furnishings and clothes, toys and games, and anything useful or interesting? On the first Thursday of the month, home-made cakes are also on sale. The kitchen counter is open during the 'Nearly New', serving tea, coffee, toast, bacon sandwiches etc for a small price, and someone is usually playing the piano. Many people drop in here each week for a sit down and a natter, and all are welcome. [Please note the Nearly New is closed during January each year]
St Mary's Women's Fellowship meets on the first Monday afternoon of the month (at 2:30pm in the Guild Hall, St Mary's Road) to listen to talks on a variety of subjects, and to enjoy each other's company. All are welcome from the local community, as well as from St Mary's congregation. Contact details can be found in the Parish Magazine
1st Prittlewell Scout Group  has been part of St Mary’s Church since 1909, includes Beavers,Cubs,Scouts. We are one of the largest Scout Groups in Southend Estuary District with over 90 regular members. We meet on Tuesday evenings during term times in the Church Halls. As well as weekly meetings where we work towards challenge and activity badges, we also take part in District Events, and go on camps and day trips. If you have a young person who would like to join our Group please email with their name and date of birth and we will let you know if they are able to join straight away or add them to our waiting list. Please send enquiries for Beavers, Cubs or Scouts by email to: cubs@1stprittlewell.org.uk
First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
HOME GROUPS
"Let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the day drawing near. " Hebrews 10:24.   Home Groups are a vital part of Church life - they give us the opportunity to gather in small groups to study the Bible, discuss aspects of our Christian faith and pray. We currently have two home groups. One which meets during the day and the other in the evening, both meet every two weeks. These groups are an expression of the unity we share in God, as they are an opportunity for us to share life together as Christians. Each group has its own 'flavour', but each session begins with a prayer, followed by a discussion on the Bible or aspect of Christian faith. We always end by praying for one another, our Church, and wider national and international issues. Afterwards we have time for fellowship and chatting about life in general.   Home Groups offer us a needed context in which we can learn to trust and grow, a context in which we can love one another, exhort one another, speak to one another, honour one another, receive one another, watch over and care for one another. It is more difficult for us to develop our faith if we limit ourselves to services and church events. The Bible instructs us in Acts 2:42 (NRSV) that,   The Fellowship of the Believers   42 They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.   We see that the full implementation of God’s plan requires a small group setting. These small groups, are therefore a vital part of God’s plan. Just as the early church often met in homes, so too can we. It is interesting that the vast majority of growing churches today have some kind of home group network in place, through which new people are added, strengthened and developed for the purposes of our God.   If you would like to know more about the Home Groups please contact the Rev. Paul Mackay or Rev. Jackie Lindoe.
First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
Home Groups
"Let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the day drawing near. " Hebrews 10:24.   Home Groups are a vital part of Church life - they give us the opportunity to gather in small groups to study the Bible, discuss aspects of our Christian faith and pray. We currently have two home groups. One which meets during the day and the other in the evening, both meet every two weeks. These groups are an expression of the unity we share in God, as they are an opportunity for us to share life together as Christians. Each group has its own 'flavour', but each session begins with a prayer, followed by a discussion on the Bible or aspect of Christian faith. We always end by praying for one another, our Church, and wider national and international issues. Afterwards we have time for fellowship and chatting about life in general.   Home Groups offer us a needed context in which we can learn to trust and grow, a context in which we can love one another, exhort one another, speak to one another, honour one another, receive one another, watch over and care for one another. It is more difficult for us to develop our faith if we limit ourselves to services and church events. The Bible instructs us in Acts 2:42 (NRSV) that,   The Fellowship of the Believers   42 They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.   We see that the full implementation of God’s plan requires a small group setting. These small groups, are therefore a vital part of God’s plan. Just as the early church often met in homes, so too can we. It is interesting that the vast majority of growing churches today have some kind of home group network in place, through which new people are added, strengthened and developed for the purposes of our God.   If you would like to know more about the Home Groups please contact the Rev. Paul Mackay or Rev. Jackie Lindoe.
First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
OUR HISTORY
A Brief History of the Church of Saint Mary the Virgin For more than a thousand years there has been a church on the site of Saint Mary's, Prittlewell. When the Saxons settled here, soon after the Roman Legions had left Britain, they found a fine, dry site overlooking the river Thames, with a fresh water stream - the Prittle Brook - and good grazing land nearby. There is archaeological evidence that a small chapel was erected on the site of the present church in the 7th century. A portion of the Saxon doorway of that tiny chapel remains today as part of the north wall of the chancel.For four hundred years or so, the small Saxon chapel served the developing village of Prittlewell. In the 11th century, the Norman nave was built, which greatly enlarged the building, and the chancel of the new church was built over the foundations of the old Saxon chapel. The church at Prittlewell is mentioned in the Domesday Survey of 1086.Towards the end of the 12th century, a processional aisle was added to the south side of the nave. The south aisle was enlarged and completed in the late 15th century, almost doubling the size of the church.In the 15th century, the magnificent tower was built, together with a porch and an eastern wall that now forms part of the Jesus Chapel. Since then, the structure of the church remains unaltered, save for the addition of the vestries in modern times. When the town of Southend-on-Sea was established at the 'Southe Ende' of Prittlewell village, the church of Saint Mary the Virgin became the mother church of Southend.Over the centuries, the church at Prittlewell has seen joyous times, and has fallen on hard times. Shortly after Henry VIII's reign, at the time of the Reformation, so much of the church's income and assets were seized that the churchwardens sold the church plate to 'pay for maintenance of the church'. In the Second World War, Saint Mary's suffered blast damage from bombs falling nearby, but daily services continued at the normal times throughout those difficult years. It is said that the Vicar at that time - Canon Ellis Gowing - had the valuable 16th century stained glass window removed from the Jesus Chapel 
15th Century Tower. The tower is constructed of Kentish ragstone and the soft stone known as 'hassock'. The core of the thick walls is of rubble, mainly composed of chalk and flint.The height of the tower is eighty-four feet to the string course below the View-From the north-east corner of the churchyard, looking towards the west. Lych Gate view from West Door This is the view looking north, across Priory park towards Rochford and beyond to the river Crouch. The View to the south-west showing part of Prittlewell village, Westcliff beyond, and the river Thames in the distance. Remains of Saxon Door North Wall. A closer look at the position of the Saxon doorway (between the two stained glass windows).
First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
OUR HISTORY
A Brief History of the Church of Saint Mary the Virgin For more than a thousand years there has been a church on the site of Saint Mary's, Prittlewell. When the Saxons settled here, soon after the Roman Legions had left Britain, they found a fine, dry site overlooking the river Thames, with a fresh water stream - the Prittle Brook - and good grazing land nearby. There is archaeological evidence that a small chapel was erected on the site of the present church in the 7th century. A portion of the Saxon doorway of that tiny chapel remains today as part of the north wall of the chancel.For four hundred years or so, the small Saxon chapel served the developing village of Prittlewell. In the 11th century, the Norman nave was built, which greatly enlarged the building, and the chancel of the new church was built over the foundations of the old Saxon chapel. The church at Prittlewell is mentioned in the Domesday Survey of 1086.Towards the end of the 12th century, a processional aisle was added to the south side of the nave. The south aisle was enlarged and completed in the late 15th century, almost doubling the size of the church.In the 15th century, the magnificent tower was built, together with a porch and an eastern wall that now forms part of the Jesus Chapel. Since then, the structure of the church remains unaltered, save for the addition of the vestries in modern times. When the town of Southend-on-Sea was established at the 'Southe Ende' of Prittlewell village, the church of Saint Mary the Virgin became the mother church of Southend.Over the centuries, the church at Prittlewell has seen joyous times, and has fallen on hard times. Shortly after Henry VIII's reign, at the time of the Reformation, so much of the church's income and assets were seized that the churchwardens sold the church plate to 'pay for maintenance of the church'. In the Second World War, Saint Mary's suffered blast damage from bombs falling nearby, but daily services continued at the normal times throughout those difficult years. It is said that the Vicar at that time - Canon Ellis Gowing - had the valuable 16th century stained glass window removed from the Jesus Chapel 
15th Century Tower. The tower is constructed of Kentish ragstone and the soft stone known as 'hassock'. The core of the thick walls is of rubble, mainly composed of chalk and flint.The height of the tower is eighty-four feet to the string course below the View-From the north-east corner of the churchyard, looking towards the west. Lych Gate view from West Door Remains of Saxon Door North Wall. A closer look at the position of the Saxon doorway (between the two stained glass windows).
First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
CONTACT US
Vicar: The Revd Paul Mackay, email: revpaulstmarys@hotmail.com  Vicarage Telephone 01702 343470 Postal Address: Prittlewell Parish Church, East Street, Prittlewell, Southend-on-Sea, Essex, SS2 6LQ The early Parish Registers of Saint Mary's, Prittlewell (Baptisms 1689-1812, Marriages 1645-1812, Burials 1645-1812) are held by The Essex Record Office, Wharf Road, Chelmsford, Essex, CM2 6YT Baptism, Marriage,  Funeral enquiries, contact the Parish Administrator in person in the Church Office or by telephone (01702 466471), on Wednesdays between 10:00 am and 2:30 pm, or Thursdays between 9:00 am and 12.30 pm, or by email: stmaryprittlewell@gmail.com Wherever possible, please contact the Church Office during these office hours, but you may also telephone the Vicarage out of hours if needs be. Halls booking enquiries, contact the Halls Booking Secretary on Telephone 01702 332491 St. Mary's Parish Magazine enquiries, contact the Magazine Editor by email: prittlewellparishmag@vfemail.net Beavers, Cubs and Scouts, email: cubs@1stprittlewell.org.uk Website Feedback : Web Team
Assistant Curate: Revd Jacky Lindoe Vicar: The Revd Paul Mackay, email: revpaulstmarys@hotmail.com
First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
CONTACT US
Vicar: The Revd Paul Mackay, email: revpaulstmarys@hotmail.com Assistant Curate: Revd Jacky Lindoe
Vicar: The Revd Paul Mackay, email: revpaulstmarys@hotmail.com  Vicarage Telephone 01702 343470 Postal Address: Prittlewell Parish Church, East Street, Prittlewell, Southend-on-Sea, Essex, SS2 6LQ The early Parish Registers of Saint Mary's, Prittlewell (Baptisms 1689-1812, Marriages 1645-1812, Burials 1645-1812) are held by The Essex Record Office, Wharf Road, Chelmsford, Essex, CM2 6YT Baptism, Marriage,  Funeral enquiries, contact the Parish Administrator in person in the Church Office or by telephone (01702 466471), on Wednesdays between 10:00 am and 2:30 pm, or Thursdays between 9:00 am and 12.30 pm, or by email: stmaryprittlewell@gmail.com Wherever possible, please contact the Church Office during these office hours, but you may also telephone the Vicarage out of hours if needs be. Halls booking enquiries, contact the Halls Booking Secretary on Telephone 01702 332491 St. Mary's Parish Magazine enquiries, contact the Magazine Editor by email: prittlewellparishmag@vfemail.net Beavers, Cubs and Scouts, email: cubs@1stprittlewell.org.uk Website Feedback :Web Team
First Published May 2000. Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC.  No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
Links
This page has links to the School,Charities and companies St Marys Supports
HARP is the Southend-on-Sea charity reducing homelessness by providing essential services, emergency housing and long term solutions - enabling people to rebuild their lives and return to independent living.
All Aspects of tree surgery 24hr Emergency Call Out Service Stump Removal, Tree Felling Garden Maintenance Grass Cutting, Rubbish Removal Fully Insured
At St. Mary’s Church of England School, we seek to provide the best possible education for each child within a safe Caring Christian Community by worshipping, learning and growing together in faith.
Click On Image for Council Services and Website.
Click On Image for Church Of England Website.
First Published May 2000. Mobile Version . Last update November 2016 KHT. Text and Pictures Copyright © St Mary's Prittlewell PCC. No part of this web site may be reproduced without prior written permission of the copyright owners.
Links Page
This page has links to the School,Charities and companies St Marys Supports
At St. Mary’s Church of England School, we seek to provide the best possible education for each child within a safe Caring Christian Community by worshipping, learning and growing together in faith.
Click On Image for Council Services and Website.
HARP is the Southend-on-Sea charity reducing homelessness by providing essential services, emergency housing and long term solutions - enabling people to rebuild their lives and return to independent living.
All Aspects of tree surgery 24hr Emergency Call Out Service Stump Removal, Tree Felling Garden Maintenance Grass Cutting, Rubbish Removal Fully Insured Telephone: 07905448095
Click On Image for Church Of England Website.